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Dummies Guide to Rigging a Speargun

1shot

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Mar 6, 2006
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#41
Great stuff you guys.

Another variation with the float line/reel issue is the use of a float line that's not attached to any float. Reel lines tend to tangle and get knotty compared to float lines, which are more slippery and easier to handle.

In kelp or for fish that tend to hole quickly after being shot, a float line without a float attached is a nice thing to have with a break-away setup.
 

Bill McIntyre

San Clemente, CA
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#43
1shot said:
In kelp or for fish that tend to hole quickly after being shot, a float line without a float attached is a nice thing to have with a break-away setup.
Like these. The float is just something to grab after all the line is pulled through your hand.
 

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Bill McIntyre

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#44
Shadowkiller said:
Worst case is that you heat the entire crimp and make the mono on either end brittle.
Everyone who I have seen melting the end of the mono does it with the end held out in the clear away from the crimp. Then after its cooled, you pull the mono back through and crimp it.
 

Huan

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#45
When I melt the end of the Mono, I use the hot knife attachment on the soldering gun.
I also put a small piece of thin metal sheet between the tag-end and the standing part of the line
 

Shadowkiller

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#46
Bill McIntyre said:
Everyone who I have seen melting the end of the mono does it with the end held out in the clear away from the crimp. Then after its cooled, you pull the mono back through and crimp it.
The amount of heat stress related failures Ive seen in my engineering career have made me very wary of retempering anything...

No matter how much care you take, at the end of the day youve changed the structure of the plastic.
 
OP
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miles

miles

BORN WILD!!!
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Jun 13, 2003
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#47
Hiya

Often, when putting extreme pressure on your shooting line, your line will pull through your crimp before it breaks. So by burning the ends into a blob, it helps the mono from not being pulled through the crimp.

I use a single crimp, with burnt ends on my 2.0mm, 2.2mm and 2.5mm mono shooting lines for our tuna and have yet to have one of them fail. Those fish test equipment to the extreme!! Going to start using double crimps, as per Bill McTyre's suggestions, just for added security.

Not disputing the fact that heating the ends might cause the line to weaken, just adding that it isn't weakened signifcantly enough for me to notice it.

Regards
miles
 
Jan 3, 2004
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#48
I recently got a threaded shaft for my aggressor and want to set it up as a breakaway. I want to set it up like yours but i'm kinda lost at how you attached the bungie.By the pic it looks like the mono is one continous length
from the spear to the loop for the float and the bungie is attached to it some how. Thanks Miles
 

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miles

miles

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#49
Hiya

Sorry for the slow response time!!

The mono is indeed a single long peice. I like the end of the mono to be about a foot longer. This allows the clip from your floatline to be a foot away from your gun making it easier to swing the gun with-out the clip banging against the gun.

I normally slide a crimp onto the shooting line before making the final loop in the mono, that will attach to the clip of your floatline. I then position the loose sliding crimp, so that there is just enough tension on the small bungee. I then crimp it in place. Check the picture in case my explanantion isn't understandable.

The previous bungees worked well, but they'd often rip off when pulling the spearline through a shot fish. With these type of bungees, i simply remove them, then pull the spearline through. Very easy to put back.

Regards
miles
 

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JimmyB

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Nov 1, 2004
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#51
miles said:
Now that the reel is mounted and the ring/bracket is on the gun, you run the line from the reel, through the bracket/ring. I normally attach a clip to the line now. This allows you to remove the shooting line should the need arise.
Whats the best knot to use when tying your clip to the reel line??
 

Mr. X

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#55
If you are looking for alternative knots to the bowline suggested above(?), a friend often uses an unusual low-profile knot where others normally use a bowline or double-figure 8. The knot is a simple thumb-knot followed by one-side of a double-fisherman's knot. The main difference it that it is more compact (I would think the thumb knot is unnecessary in this case) as you cinch it up tight rather than creating a fixed loop.

Alternatively, I have been using knots from this page quite a lot recently: http://www.animatedknots.com/indexfishing.php?LogoImage=LogoGrog.jpg&Website=www.animatedknots.com
e.g. the Arbor knot for tying line to a reel & the Palormar knot for tying swivels/hooks.

I would use the Palormar knot (some sites claim this knot does not weaken the line at all) - simple but secure. [I used to use a hook-tyer which made a Uni-knot something like a Snell (v. strong) & before that I used a fisherman's knot ("basic clinch") -- which is ok but not great)]

Alternatively the surgeons knot (shown on the same page)? [Looks similar in concept to the Alison's constrictor knot (serial thumb knots) but with doubled line].

There is also an advanced version of the Allbright knot, the Alberto knot, that involves creating spirals both up & down the loop which is covered in an article on another site which is supposedly very strong (I have used it several times & it certainly seems strong - a bit messy & awkward to tie though).

[More fishing knots: http://www.angelfire.com/ia3/fishing/knots.htm ]
 
Last edited:
#56
Apart from being a hitch that i have trusted my life to lots of times aloft on tall ships the other benifit of a bowline ( part from 250 years of use at sea ) is the ease that you can breack its neck and untie it after it has been subjected to heavy load thus you dont have to re rig..

just my two cents as a man who has worked at sea most of his life. If it aint broken dont fix it!
 

Ricochet

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Jul 23, 2004
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#58
Great article!
I just got my first speargun and this article does help, indeed :)

Unfortunately my Commanche didn't come with any monofiliament nor with crimps or shock absorber.

So I wonder where I can buy such crimps?! I couldn't find any at the local building centers. I'll try a handicraft shop now.

Can someone also give me any hints on how to make a shockabsorber? I have some latex hose and surgical rubber left and might use that.

Thanks in advance.