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Thread Status: Hello , There was no answer in this thread for more than 60 days.
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BIG C

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Feb 2, 2004
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test 2
 

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island_sands

Erection Supervisor ;)
Supporter
Jan 19, 2001
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oceanic triggerfish? is there nothing that you spearos won't eat? :)
 

GrumpyDre

New Member
Jan 2, 2004
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Man, from what I hear thos thins are tasty...
By the Big C congrats on your first kill....
Looking forward to our first trip.
 
O

octopus

Guest
Food? No.
Challenge? No.
Self-defence? Well...they can be teritorial...but no.

Some people would spear just about anything. :(
 

rigdvr

Not Available in Stores
May 28, 2002
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Originally posted by octopus
Food? No.
Challenge? No.
Self-defence? Well...they can be teritorial...but no.

Some people would spear just about anything. :(

What the hell are you talking about? Those triggers are awesome eating. They are also the Gulf of Mexico's saltwater pihrana...They will clip an earlobe of a dive quicker than you can blink.

Big C, head over to spearboard.com, most here are pompous holier than thou freedivers. Many other rig hunters can be found over there.
 
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ajwaverider

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Jan 3, 2004
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Originally posted by octopus
Food? No.
Challenge? No.
Self-defence? Well...they can be teritorial...but no.

Some people would spear just about anything. :(


Food ?Yes
Challenge?Yes
Self- Defence? possibly

Ocean triggerfish are a prized food fish .Here in Jax the will cost you around $3.50 a pound if you can find them .The commercial fisherman can hardly catch them because of the structure they like and also maybe the Comm fishermans overfishing and bycatch.I think anywhere along the gulf coast or east coast for that matter you will find triggerfish to have a good food value.
As for freediving or scuba it doesn't matter in this section because it's for fish photos period!! I have to admit I do enjoy looking at any fish shot while freediving because you are limited to depth and to time under the water.I've seen many fish shot using scuba that dwarfed any fish that i've shot freediving but I
doubt that it required the skill and total commitment that freediving does .

Oh yeh I am a certified scuba diver.
 

rigdvr

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May 28, 2002
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id be careful before I stated that freediving takes more commitment than scuba unless you have dove under those circumstances. I do both on the oil rigs here and diving a structure in 1100' of water shooting 100+# fish with a murk layer 30' thick and currents sweeping out from the mighty Mississippi river isnt as easy as it sounds...

I say that as someone who hasnt used a tank in over 2 years but still recognizes the challenges such diving presents.
 
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island_sands

Erection Supervisor ;)
Supporter
Jan 19, 2001
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eating trigger fish

Apparently the oceanic triggers are good eating. The caymanians used to catch them in their hundreds...

The Titan triggers.. that's another story... there was one really aggressive titan that we had on a particular divesite, a huge [email protected], and he kept attacking people, biting them on the head etc.

One of the locals said one day, [email protected], i am going to kill that [email protected] so he speared it and took it back to the island and put it on the barbie..

eeeeeeeeewwwwwwwwwwwwwwwww..... man, did that thing get it's own back on us... it stank to high heaven.. spoiled the whole barbie and we had to wash the grid and start again...

i guess that was nature's way of telling us what we're not supposed to eat... who knows?
 

sublimished

the white whale
May 2, 2004
50
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Are all trigger fish that way? I remember in Maui over spring break seeing lots of picasso triggerfish while snorkeling by the hotel. Most of them were very shy, but I remember this one that was very aggresive. Not big enough to do any harm, but the little guy would charge straight towards my face, then veer to the side right before hitting me. Suprised me at first, but realized he wasnt doing anything and snapped photos as he kept charging me several times :p
 

ajwaverider

New Member
Jan 3, 2004
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That maybe true for those of you that dive the rigs but the majority of scuba divers don't. If your going to start freediving
you have to prepare your body for it ,working on holding your breath and learning how to deal with the enviroment without air
assistance.Anybody can become a scuba diver but not many scuba divers can freedive. Simply put (strap on tank ,insert regulator,breath ) it's just that simple . As for spearboard.com
i've tried to talk to some people from my area that scuba and haven't met anyone that doesn't suffer from a severe case of tunnel vision.I don't even post any pics of fish because they like to bash freedivers.
 

island_sands

Erection Supervisor ;)
Supporter
Jan 19, 2001
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bashing freedivers

[[I don't even post any pics of fish because they like to bash freedivers.]]

yep. must be awful having some fish invade the freedivers territory. perhaps we should ask the fish to wait on the beach until you are finished. :)
 

island_sands

Erection Supervisor ;)
Supporter
Jan 19, 2001
7,998
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for sublimished - trigger fish

i have noticed that most trigger fish are aggressive. very territorial, especially around their nests.

the most aggressive i have seen are the yellow margin trigger fish. they are about the same size or a little larger than the titans and their nip is nasty.

if you swim/dive near a nesting trigger fish you should avoid the triangular area going upwards to the surface from the nest, as that is generally his territory.
 

island_sands

Erection Supervisor ;)
Supporter
Jan 19, 2001
7,998
1,281
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not many scuba divers can freedive?

Anybody can become a scuba diver but not many scuba divers can freedive

interesting. where do you get that information?

of all the freedivers that i have had contact with, 99% of them do scuba as well.

Is this thread about fish photos going to turn into a peeing contest about who's better? (freedivers or scubadivers?) or are we going to discuss what this is really about...

FISH.
 

Alison

Offline
Mar 6, 2004
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Re: not many scuba divers can freedive?

Originally posted by island_sands

Is this thread about fish photos going to turn into a peeing contest about who's better? (freedivers or scubadivers?) or are we going to discuss what this is really about...

FISH.

Your right! I do both, I enjoy both! If you cant enjoy your sport or let others enjoy their sport, then jack it in and take up boxing

Talking about boxing! Those tiny redtooth trigger fish in the Gulf and Red Sea are aggressive little buggers, no bigger than the tip of my little finger and squaring up to me face to face :head
 
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