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Open or closed muzzle

Bill McIntyre

San Clemente, CA
Staff member
Forum Mentor
Jan 27, 2005
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San Clemente, CA
Here is a photo to illustrate. The wishbone of the first band is on the rear of three fins. This band isn't loaded since I'm afraid to do that out of the water. It would be thinner if stretched, but the two side would be pulled tight against each other. See how it would be hard to get to the two front fins with the band already loaded on the rear fin. It would help if you had a very long wishbone, but I think even a long wishbone would keep you from getting wishbones of subsequent bands down to a slot in the shaft.
53707
 
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Bellboy7

Bellboy7

Member
Jan 13, 2019
30
4
13
45
New Zealand
If you load the first band to the rear notch or fin then the front notch or fin will be buried under that band and you will have a very hard time getting the wishbone of the second band down to it. It there is a tall front fin you might have a chance, but its a notch in the shaft then I think its almost impossible to get the wishbone down through the first band to the slot.
yeah thanks bill, in nz we have a spearfishing shop called oceanhunter.co.nz i went to try on some ruku fins and while i was there the shop owner showed me how to load my RA,AND SAME AS U SAID,,, cheers for sharing ur wise words mates, u guys are so helpful on here i wish u lived in nz so i could go spearfishing with u guys,
So i tried on a few different foot pockets, mares felt so uncomfortable, ruku pockets were nice just a bit hard on the top of my foot, BEUCHAT were beautiful, like putting on a pair of slipper so i got ruku seaweed green blades put into beuchat foot pocket, they had to be sent away to be glued, BUT ALLGOOD, i cant wait to try them, hopefully this weekend, fingers
 

Mr. X

Forum Mentor
Staff member
Forum Mentor
Jul 14, 2005
7,064
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Sunny Britain
Do you have long thin feet or broad stocky feet? Some claim Beuchats suit the former but I have the latter and have happily used them for more than a dozen years. I.e. they seem to suit many/most(/all?) Feet.

I think part of the above myth came about because some say your toes should show through the hole at the front of the footpocket. That is a spurious, arbitrary assertion IMHO. It is of no consequence if the fins are comfortable and fit well.

Omersub footpocket are well regarded too.

BTW I did not need to use any glue to replace my blade, just 2 screws and 2 clips. But perhaps your blades require more (carbon/ fibreglass?).
 
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Bellboy7

Bellboy7

Member
Jan 13, 2019
30
4
13
45
New Zealand
FWIW, my Moana carbon fiber blades had to be glued into my Pathos foot pockets.
Bill ur opinion is always greatly appreciated, lol, mr x my feet are usually a 9.5 but i have a high arch, i think u could just see my toes in a 43/44 but man the beuchats were so comfortable i could hardly tell they were on, worth the extra $50, i guess as long as everyone's super comfortable in there fins thats all that matters,
 
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Bellboy7

Bellboy7

Member
Jan 13, 2019
30
4
13
45
New Zealand
I wasn’t critiquing your choice of fins. Mr X said his fins didn’t need glue and I simply pointing out that some do.
  • I know, bill, i never said u were critiquing, u said fwiw for whats its worth and i was simply saying THAT UR opinion is greatly appreciated, and thanks for sharing ur wise words, u cant beat experience BILL, MY EARS ARE TUNNED in to anything u have to share mate, ill soak it up like a sponge, so please share share share, nothing but respect here, u too mr x, thanks very greatful
 
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Bellboy7

Bellboy7

Member
Jan 13, 2019
30
4
13
45
New Zealand
  • I know, bill, i never said u were critiquing, u said fwiw for whats its worth and i was simply saying THAT UR opinion is greatly appreciated, and thanks for sharing ur wise words, u cant beat experience BILL, MY EARS ARE TUNNED in to anything u have to share mate, ill soak it up like a sponge, so please share share share, nothing but respect here, u too mr x, thanks very greatful
Can i ask what ur guys, breath up routine is at the surface before each dive???, ive been doing apnea tables to strenghten my breath hold times, i can comfortably do 2.30min static and ive done on 3 separate occasionsaa 3 min breath hold at my ultimate pushing it to max in my room on my lazy boy, but cant always make it, id like to eventually be able to do that CONSTANTLY, , HOW DEEP CAN U DIVE AND HUNT ON 2.30 min breath hold????, whats ur guys average dive tine
 

Mr. X

Forum Mentor
Staff member
Forum Mentor
Jul 14, 2005
7,064
1,328
418
Sunny Britain
The freediving area of the forum is the place to research breath training and breathing up.

I deliberately don't train breath hold. I dive alone so depend on my body's natural defences. I don't wear a dive computer but down times vary a lot, both within each dive and throughout the season. The first couple of dives are usually quite short but get longer the longer I dive for. Similar down times improve over the season. This isn't something I am particularly conscious of, I only became aware of it because others commented on it. I don't push it, it isn't hard, it's more like I relax into it. Getting longer down times towards the end of the season actually feels effortless compared to shorter dives early in the season.

As for breathing up, when I think about it, I lay face down at the surface and breath through my snorkel. I try to relax. Then, when I feel relaxed, I take 4 slow, only moderately deep, relaxed breaths and hold the last one. I am not trying to capture a lot of oxygen, instead I am trying to be relaxed; that seems to work better for me. Later in the season, or towards the end of a week of diving, I don't need to think about it and just "go with the flow", there is like a smooth rhythm to the whole swim/rest/dive thing, which in itself is relaxing and probably helps.

I'm not advocating this approach, it's just what I do.
 
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Reactions: Andrew the fish

Andrew the fish

Well-Known Member
Oct 17, 2010
339
48
68
Burnaby BC Canada
Bellboy, we have beaten this topic to death in one other thread. Mr X said it again, he (we , a lot of us) do not train for time or depth. This way we are never chasing the numbers, and they (numbers) have no meaning anyway. Aside form numbers being useless, there is no fish "to die for" either. To put it into the right perspective, the fishing spot where I spearfish has taken a few lives already.

Since you asked twice, I will give you the rough figures. I am not sure I can word it correctly to get the message across. Most new freedivers get rather quickly, within a year of training, to about 2 minutes dive times, and to about 30 meter depth. You will get there when you are ready, without having to push boundaries of safety, so there is no point in trying to get there with deliberate effort.

Apnea tables teach you how to defeat your body's built-in safety margin. They are developed for competitive freedivers who dive in controlled environment, with safety divers all around, crystal clear piss-warm waters, and they still manage to die on occasion.

Ok, my last try and then I will shut up. Tell me, how much you enjoyed doing breath hold tables in your lazybody chair? Was it fun? Pleasure? Or was it nothing but pain. Imagine that you will get better at breath hold diving while doing enjoyable, easy breath hold diving. In the water. With spear gun.